Decision: State v. White

July 17th. The Kansas Supreme Court has issued its opinion in State v. White (No. 100,264), a motion to withdraw a plea. In a unanimous opinion, written by Justice Marla Luckert, the Court held that (contra the District Court’s ruling) Harry White had rebutted the presumption that he had received effective assistance from his lawyer. The Case was therefore remanded for further fact finding as to whether he would be able to withdraw his no-contest plea to aggravated indecent liberties with a child under the age of 14.

Harry White sexually abused three girls many times over a period of years spanning the introduction of Jessica’s Law. He was charged with 8 counts relating to that conduct, including one under Jessica’s Law. Prior to trial, White entered into a plea agreement that he would plead to the Jessica’s Law charge and the others would be dropped. White was 69 years old at the time he was charged.

White’s plea agreement incorrectly stated that the maximum sentence he could receive would be one of not less than 25 years in prison. In fact his maximum sentence would be life, without the possibility of parole for 25 years. Prior to sentencing, White appears to have figured out that he reaped no net benefit from having the other 7 charges dismissed and sought to withdraw his plea.

His argument was that the plea agreement was incorrect and therefore he received ineffective assistance of counsel and did not knowingly make the plea. The District Court rejected his motion, finding that the plea agreement was clear (in terms of the potential consequences for White, i.e. that he would die in prison) and stated that during the enactment of the plea agreement the Court had correctly reviewed it with White (which can correct an error in a written agreement).

The Kansas Supreme Court reversed the District Court on this point. It found that the plea agreement was not clear, and that the transcript of the proceeding reviewing the plea agreement included a potentially misleading statement by the Judge which White might have misinterpreted to mean he would be eligible for probation.

Therefore, the District Court’s ruling on the motion to withdraw the plea was reversed and the case remanded back to the District Court to consider the remaining parts of the test for ineffective assistance of counsel, and a determination whether White’s plea may be withdrawn.

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