Donnie Ventris loses the rest of his appeal

July 24th. When the United States Supreme Court recently overturned the Kansas Supreme Court’s ruling in Kansas v. Ventris, it remanded the case for further proceedings. The Kansas Supreme Court has now issued its ruling on the remainder of the case. In a unanimous opinion, written by Justice Eric Rosen, the Court vacated its previous ruling in favor of Donnie Ventris and reinstated and affirmed the Court of Appeals’ decision affirming his conviction for aggravated robbery and aggravated burglary. In doing so it dispensed with two arguments Ventris had made which it had not addressed previously.

The background to this case has been covered extensively on this blog, linked articles all bear the KSvVentris tag. Ventris and his girlfriend, Rhonda Theel, were involved in the shooting death of Ernest Hicks, and left the scene of his murder with money and other possessions of his. Theel turned state’s evidence. A cellmate of Ventris’ (placed in the cell as a mole) spoke to him about the killing and also presented evidence at trial. Ventris was actually acquitted of the murder charge, but convicted of aggravated burglary and aggravated robbery. Ventris’ argued that the cellmate’s testimony should have been barred, even for the limited use (counteracting Ventris’ own testimony). The Kansas Supreme Court initially agreed with Ventris but the U.S. Supreme Court overturned that decision.

In its first opinion the Kansas Supreme Court did not address Ventris’ argument that testimony by Theel that he had forcibly strip-searched her a month before the killing should have been disallowed. Ventris argued that this error entitled him to a new trial. The Kansas Supreme Court has now addressed this issue and found that while the testimony should not have been allowed, it constituted a harmless error and thus Ventris does not get a new trial. The Court ruled that since the evidence did not go towards proving anything that was before the jury it failed the test for whether evidence is probative under State v. Gunby.

The Court also rejected Ventris’ Apprendi claim regarding his sentence based on his prior criminal history score.

The full text of the Court’s opinion is here.

Ventris’ argued that the cellmate’s testimony should have been barred, even for the limited use (counteracting Ventris’ own testminony). The Kansas Supreme Court initially agreed with Ventris but the U.S. Supreme Court overturned that decision.
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