Decision: State v. Easterling

August 7th. The Kansas Supreme Court has issued its opinion in State v. Easterling (No. 100,454) a Jessica’s Law Sentencing Appeal. In a unanimous opinion, written by Justice Lee Johnson, the Court upheld David Easterling’s sentence to life without parole for 25 years, for the molestation of his granddaughter.

David Easterling sexually abused his 5 year old granddaughter. He was reported and arrested. During his interrogation (after waiving his Miranda rights), he admitted to having abused his daughter in the same way in the 1980s. His wife admitted that she had known about this. Easterling pled guilty to his crimes, in a plea arrangement under which the Shawnee County prosecutors agreed to request a departure sentence of just under 10 years instead of the presumptive Jessica’s Law sentence. The District Court noted the information about the 1980s abuse was contained in a sworn affidavit by a the interrogating police officer. The District Court refused the durational departure, sentencing Easterling to life without parole for 25 years.

Easterling appealed on two grounds. His first argument was that the inclusion of the evidence on the affidavit breached his Due Process rights to a fair trial. His second was that the Jessica’s Law sentence was a cruel and unusual punishment.

On the first argument the Court examined prior cases and determined that there was a Due Process question to be examined, making this the first Kansas case which explicitly states that Due Process must be afforded at sentencing. The Court found that, since the affidavit was signed under penalty of perjury, by a law enforcement officer and involved admissions by Easterling and his wife that a reasonable person would not make falsely, the evidence was considered to be reliable. It concluded that he had not been denied Due Process since the Court had notified him and his Counsel that it would be looking at the affidavit and he therefore in his argument for mitigation had had an opportunity to argue against it. Therefore the District Court did not deny Easterling his Due Process rights at trial.

On the challenge to the constitutionality of the Jessica’s Law sentencing regime, the Court found that since Easterling had not objected at trial on these grounds he could not raise the matter on appeal. It did consider whether the case’s procedural posture meant that it could consider the matter anyway, but decided otherwise.

Easterling’s sentence to life in prison without the possibility of parole for 25 years was therefore upheld.

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